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State v. Renteria

Court of Appeals of Idaho

February 28, 2018

STATE OF IDAHO, Plaintiff-Respondent,
v.
MARCOS A. RENTERIA, Defendant-Appellant.

         2018 Opinion No. 9

         Appeal from the District Court of the Third Judicial District, State of Idaho, Canyon County. Hon. George A. Southworth, District Judge.

         Order of the district court denying motion to suppress, affirmed.

          Ramirez Smith & Tvinnereim; Deena Tvinnereim, Nampa, for appellant.

          Hon. Lawrence G. Wasden, Attorney General; Russell J. Spencer, Deputy Attorney General, Boise, for respondent.

          GRATTON, Chief Judge.

         Marcos A. Renteria appeals from the district court's judgment of conviction entered upon his conditional guilty plea to trafficking in cocaine. Specifically, Renteria challenges the district court's denial of his motion to suppress evidence acquired during a traffic stop. We affirm.

         I.

         FACTUAL AND PROCEDURAL BACKGROUND

         Renteria made a quick lane change on Interstate 84 in violation of Idaho Code § 49-808, which requires drivers to signal continuously for not less than five seconds before changing lanes. On that basis, Idaho State Police Trooper Sproat pulled Renteria over. Upon making contact with Renteria and a passenger, Trooper Sproat requested their identification, vehicle registration, and proof of insurance. Renteria handed the trooper his driver's license and began to search for the vehicle's registration and proof of insurance. As Renteria searched for the registration and proof of insurance, Trooper Sprout asked where the two men were coming from; what they did for work; whether they had previously received tickets or been arrested; and whether there were any drugs, marijuana, cocaine, cash, or weapons in the vehicle. Renteria said no. He then provided the vehicle registration to the trooper but could not produce proof of insurance.

         After collecting the driver's license and registration, Trooper Sproat walked from Renteria's car back to his patrol car and, while doing so, requested the assistance of a canine officer from dispatch. Once inside his patrol car, Trooper Sproat relayed Renteria's name and date of birth to the dispatcher for purposes of a warrants check and a driver's license check. While awaiting a response from dispatch, the canine officer arrived with his drug-detection dog. Trooper Sproat explained to the canine officer why he suspected Renteria of drug activity. The canine officer removed Renteria and the passenger from the vehicle and proceeded to lead the dog around the vehicle. The drug-detection dog alerted to the presence of drugs three times.

         After the dog alerted, dispatch contacted Trooper Sproat and informed him that they could not find any relevant information based on the name and date of birth he had provided. Dispatch then requested Renteria's driver's license number, which Trooper Sprout provided. At this point, the drug dog was inside of Renteria's car where it alerted for a fourth time. The canine officer returned to Trooper Sproat's patrol car after completing the dog sniff and informed Trooper Sproat that the dog had alerted on the car. At approximately the same time, dispatch confirmed to Trooper Sproat that Renteria's license was valid out of Washington. The officers searched the car without a warrant and ultimately located a brick of cocaine that had been wrapped in a shirt and placed inside of a duffle bag in the trunk of Renteria's car. The officers arrested Renteria and his passenger for drug trafficking. At the jail, cocaine was also found on Renteria's person.

         In separate cases, the State charged Renteria with trafficking in cocaine, I.C. § 37-2732B, and possession of cocaine, I.C. § 37-2732(c)(1). The cases were consolidated, and Renteria filed a motion to suppress the evidence acquired during the traffic stop arguing his detention had been unlawfully extended. The court held a hearing and denied the motion. Renteria entered a conditional guilty plea to the trafficking charge, reserving the right to appeal the denial of his suppression motion, and the possession charge was dismissed. The district court entered a judgment of ...


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